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Once the dust has settled… 6 ways forward!

You have a manuscript of 60,000 words.

It is undeniably poor quality.  Barely literate in truth.

But it does have a start, a middle and an end – it tells a story.

It is a novel.

You have written your first draft and can justifiably say you are an unpublished writer.

Elation, pride, relief, disbelief.

Then reality swoops in with piercing claws, regaining your attention.

It takes a supreme effort to re-read the dross you’ve churned out under duress of writing on demand every night for a month.  The story meanders.  The characters are vague and contradictory.  The sentences are poorly constructed, littered with typos.  And yes, in places, your writing bores you.  From ecstatic high you plunge to a new nadir. What on earth do you do next?

If nothing else, writing a hurried first draft teaches you how little you know.  How far you have to go.  Yet you MUST remember that you have addressed the hardest obstacle, that first step on any journey that takes you beyond your own front door.

Here are 6 practical steps to reignite your passion and enthusiasm for your novel – give no thought to resolving the lists of problems and questions at this time.

  1. Read novel – make no notes, no hasty decisions.
  2. Make a sheet for each character – note what you deduce about them when re-reading your novel.
  3. Start a list of questions – any questions about anything from plot to character to theme to realism – do not try to answer any of them.
  4. Make a list of research areas.
  5. Write a brief summary of what happens in each chapter – add this to your chapter title to let you  navigate your novel at light speed.
  6. Make a list of your favourite novels – try to concentrate on the genre that you are writing yourself.  This is your library from which to learn a writer’s techniques – everything from inverting expectations to punctuation of dialogue.

These measures will propel you forward from your first draft.  You will find that every walk to the shops, every tube journey or baby’s bottle-feeding time will yield several additions to these lists.

So give yourself a pat on the back – you are now an unpublished writer with momentum!

And by the time your diary frees up a half-day you will have enough material to begin the next stage with serious intent – Planning.

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